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Category: Management
  1. is it necessary to have a manager? can i manage myself?
  2. What does A & R stand for?
  3. Hi. Any advice on sending demos out to management companies? How should I present myself? Should my demo packages (biog, coverletter etc) be any different from the ones I will be sending out to record companies(for example, should I focus more on my perso



  1. is it necessary to have a manager? can i manage myself?
    Hi No it is not necessary to have a manager, in fact its far better to start by managing yourself and worry about finding a good mananger if/when the workload becomes too much to cope with doing it all yourself. If you haven't already done so, read the Artist Management section http://members.lycos.co.uk/vocalist/artist_management.html which covers the basics, supplies a list deductable expenses and provides books and resources on becoming a manager as well as tips on do's & don'ts when seeking management. Hope this helps Vocalist Webmaster
    Category: Management
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  2. What does A & R stand for?
    A & R is the short term for Artists & Repertoire. It refers to an individual who is employed by a record label or publishing company to find artists for potential signing. If the artist/band get signed then the A & R person is responsible for overseeing their progress which includes liasing with managers, producers, songwriters and the various departments within the company like promotion, art work etc., plus dealing with any problems that their artists may have. Hope this helps Tracey Vocalist.org.uk Webmaster
    Category: Management
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  3. Hi. Any advice on sending demos out to management companies? How should I present myself? Should my demo packages (biog, coverletter etc) be any different from the ones I will be sending out to record companies(for example, should I focus more on my perso
    Hi Marek, Personally I wouldn't send out demos or publicity pack unless there has been a request or response for further information. Most managers/companies get dozens of unsolicited material every day which is rarely listened to. Rather than send the whole package, start by doing some research by telephoning the company/manager and speak to the secretary or administrator. Find out the type of artist and music that they prefer to handle, if the company/manager is looking for new artists, wether they have any special criteria (i.e., must be a touring act with a fan base or only accept certain styles of music), the name of the person to address your correspondence to and as much information about the company/individual as possible. This will help you to target your music to management who are actively seeking and provide you with the details you need to introduce yourself via letter. Some companies/individuals policy is that if you can't be bothered to find out about them, why should they bother with you and after all it's a good way of finding out wether the manager/company are suitable for your career - you could be with them for a long time. If you can talk to the individual directly then don't be afraid to ask them if they would be prepared to read/hear more about you and/or see you perform live. Be very polite (even if they are not), thank them for their time and don't get annoyed if he/she aren't interested as they are only trying to save you time and money. Once you have these details you can write an introduction letter personalised to each individual. If you have managed to speak to the person you are writing to don't forget to state when you spoke to them and briefly outline the conversation to jog their memory. Keep your introduction letter short (preferably one page) and include a brief description of your music, aims and personal qualities - you can expand on these in your bio. A neat format that I've seen once or twice is a standard A4 sheet folded in half - the introductory letter and contact details on the front, picture on the 2nd page, brief biog/aims on the 3nd page, gig dates/reviews on the back although you could organise the layout any way you want. At this stage don't include a demo or publicity pack unless you have spoken personally to the individual and they have requested the material. The idea is to provide just enough information to raise their interest and want to hear/read/see more at which point you can follow up with your publicity pack or set up a meeting. It isn't necessary to have different publicity packs for management and record labels (although some people do), but any letters that are sent, wether they be introductory, follow up or cover letters accompanying publicity material should be adapted and personalised to suit the situation/individual. There are several articles on this subject from managers and other industry personel in the artist management http://www.vocalist.org.uk/artist_management.html and marketing articles http://www.vocalist.org.uk/marketing_articles.html which you might find helpful. Hope this helps and good luck in your career Tracey Webmaster Vocalist.org.uk http://www.vocalist.org.uk http://wakeup.to/vocalist
    Category: Management
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