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Category: Vocal Health
  1. I sing in a band that plays "some" aggressive music that requires me to scream. I havent experienced loss of voice,but after a while rehearsing song I get hoarse, how do I control this.
  2. what kind of foods and drinks are good or not so good for a singers vocal chords
  3. I believe I have nodules on my vocal chords,I started a job as bus driver and had an awful bus which required screaming alot and quit after 3 months when my vocals could not handle anymore and it has been semi-hoarse and painful since then.I can still sin
  4. my throat is sore all the time?
  5. Hello, I've been studying voice for three years. The last two weeks I've been noticing a lot of tension in the front part of my throat. It makes it difficult to sing and the more I think about the tension the worse it becomes. I have never had this prob
  6. Will drinking honey and lemon in warm water help my vocal chords before singing. I peeled and boiled lemon peel I added some honey to it and it sounded as though it did my voice good. I am also doing the breathing exercise on your web. Is lemon good?



  1. I sing in a band that plays "some" aggressive music that requires me to scream. I havent experienced loss of voice,but after a while rehearsing song I get hoarse, how do I control this.
    Hi Carl, There are several things you can do to ease & prevent hoarseness. Drink plenty of water during the day and whilst rehearsing/performing to ensure the vocal chords are well lubricated. (avoid alcohol & tea/coffee as they have a dehydrating effect). You'll experience hoarseness more when rehearsing because you are repeatedly going through the same songs and overstraining your vocal chords, as an occassional 'screamer' myself I find that not screaming/yelling during rehearsal helps, try singing or speaking through those songs until the final run through. When performing a set place any songs that put stress on the voice before a break or at the end of the set to give your voice a chance to recuperate. Buy 'Vocalzone' tablets available at most chemists to help soothe the throat (tastes awful but do the trick) and avoid talking as much as possible before gigs and after rehearsing to allow the vocal chords to rest. Last but most important check your 'breathing' - read the section here on breathing exercises, if you are breathing and supporting your diaphram correctly this will help to produce more control and volume without straining the voice, it takes tons of regular practice to do it correctly and you'll need patience as it may be months before you are breathing automatically from the diaphram but is worth the effort. Let me know if you still have problems.
    Category: Vocal Health
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  2. what kind of foods and drinks are good or not so good for a singers vocal chords
    I'm not a doctor or health specialist but in my experience most food and drinks are fine in moderation. Drinking lots of plain water is essential as it helps to lubricate your vocal chords and prevents dehydration. Fresh fruit n veg are great for their vitamin c content which helps your body prevent and fight infections like colds and flu. Certain foods/drinks are fine most of the time and even beneficial when experiencing illness but should be avoided prior to singing as they can affect the voice, like anything acidic or spicy which may 'burn' the cillia that lines the throat and dairy products which 'fur up' the throat. Honey is good for soothing the throat, although should be watered down and too much won't improve the waistline! Alcohol is a great relaxant if you suffer from nerves but should be avoided before and during singing if possible, spirits especially can be harsh on the throat, too much booze can affect a singers control and cause short term memory loss (err.... what were those lyrics again? ;-) Avoiding any kind of heavy meal several hours before singing allows your body to work at its optimum. A heavy meal takes a long time to digest and slows up the body. There is some excellent sites listed in the vocal health section that provide information on a wide range of issues. http://members.lycos.co.uk/vocalist/vocal_health.html
    Category: Vocal Health
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  3. I believe I have nodules on my vocal chords,I started a job as bus driver and had an awful bus which required screaming alot and quit after 3 months when my vocals could not handle anymore and it has been semi-hoarse and painful since then.I can still sin
    Hi Christina, I am not a doctor or medically trained, however I would suggest that you stop singing, rest the voice completely and see a doctor immediately. If you do have nodules you may need an operation (it's not a major one). Your surgeon will probably advise you to rest the voice for some time after the operation and you will need to see a voice specialist or therapist (some teachers specialise) who will help you to regain your voice afterwards. It will take a while after the op to regain your voice and the teacher or therapist should help you with a healthier vocal technique. It will depend on the severity of the nodules on the time of recovery but you should eventually regain the original range. The only teacher I know personally who I can recommend for voice recovery is Mark Hayden, he's based in London although I don't have a current number, he usually advertises in The Stage Newspaper. There are several medical sites who specialise in vocal problems listed in the vocal health section of the site, http://members.lycos.co.uk/vocalist/vocal_health.html they have pictures of nodes and further information that you may find of interest. Even if you don't have nodes but your voice is hoarse, stop singing, speak as little as possible, drink lots of water and allow your voice to rest completely. Honey in warm water is good for soothing the throat. Try not to use sprays or medications that numb the throat it may encourage you to overdo it and damage your voice further. Vocalzones are good and most cough sweets that contain a soothant like honey will help but the main thing is to avoid aggravating the voice further and get a doctor to take a look. Hope this helps Tracey Vocalist.org.uk Webmaster
    Category: Vocal Health
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  4. my throat is sore all the time?
    Rest your voice completely - no singing - no speaking and see a doctor or ENT specialist who may recommend you to a voice therapist. Causes could range from incorrect technique to vocal strain and if you continue to use your voice whilst experiencing soreness you could cause more damage. Hope this helps Tracey Vocalist.org.uk Webmaster
    Category: Vocal Health
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  5. Hello, I've been studying voice for three years. The last two weeks I've been noticing a lot of tension in the front part of my throat. It makes it difficult to sing and the more I think about the tension the worse it becomes. I have never had this prob
    Hi Katie, Ideally you should discuss this with your voice teacher who can observe and help you to resolve the problem. In the meantime you might like to read the page on throat tension which has some tips and links to articles containing exercises and advice. http://www.vocalist.org.uk/throat_tension.html You've partly answered your own question - 'The more I think about the tension the worse it becomes'. I know it's difficult but you should try and forget about the tension and relax completely before singing. It may help to rest the voice for a couple of days, then start with the chewing technique (described on the throat tension page), humming and singing simple fun songs or vocalise - don't think about technique or getting it right, just vocalise - does the problem still occur? It might be worth tracing your vocal steps to before the tension started. Think about what (if anything) you may be doing differently. Check your posture. Are you unconsiously hunching your shoulders, tucking in or pushing the jaw too far forward? Could there be an external reason why your body is reacting by tensing when you sing? i.e., are you going through a stressful period in your life? Have you recently had an awkward, stressful or bad practice/audition/lesson/performance experience? These are just a few contributing factors that may have triggered or be the initial cause of the tension. Theres no point in anaylizing it to death (and you'll only stress yourself out more if you dwell on the cause for too long) but if you can pinpoint the source and work on the tension with your teacher then you will find it easier to recognise future issues before they become problems. The exercises above may help but I feel that the main thing is to dispel any anxiety, avoid worrying about it and relax more. Hope this helps Tracey Vocalist.org.uk Webmaster
    Category: Vocal Health
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  6. Will drinking honey and lemon in warm water help my vocal chords before singing. I peeled and boiled lemon peel I added some honey to it and it sounded as though it did my voice good. I am also doing the breathing exercise on your web. Is lemon good?
    Hi Sherry, I'm not a doctor or medically trained but I know that vitamin C is good for preventing colds and honey has soothing properties. Personally I wouldn't drink anything acidic several hours before I sang as although lemon is good for you, it can have a drying effect on the system and the beneficial effect is probably related more to drinking warm water than the honey and lemon ;-) Drinking at least 8-9 pints of plain water (per day) is recommended. Pleased you find the breathing exercise helpful but do try and take some lessons with a singing teacher who can observe and help you to build healthy techniques. Hope this helps & good luck Tracey Vocalist Webmaster http://www.vocalist.org.uk http://wakeup.to/vocalist
    Category: Vocal Health
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